Month: December 2017

5 Ways to Stay Stress-Free at Christmas

5 Ways to Stay Stress-Free at Christmas

Christmas Eve. You’ve got the family coming round early in the morning. You’ve still not wrapped half the presents and you’ve forgotten the cranberry sauce, again.
Sound a bit like you? At Christmas time we can all get wrapped up in making everything perfect such that we forget to enjoy ourselves, and can even put our mental health at risk. Make this the year that doesn’t have to happen. Follow these 5 steps to stay stress-free on the big day.
1. Forget Timings
Whether you’re cooking the dinner or just trying to work out when you’re going to fit everything in, time can feel like it’s against you at Christmas. This year, forget what time everything ‘needs’ to happen, and remember that regardless of whether everything gets done when you planned, today will be a great day to remember. If you’ve got family coming over, realise that in reality they won’t care what time they sit down to eat, or whether you’ve managed to play every board game you had lined up. What’ll really matter is that you’re there and spending time with your loved ones.
2.Avoid filling up on sugar
As tempting as it is to eat the last of the quality street chocolates for breakfast, resist the urge and make the effort to eat or drink something proper when you first wake up. As cliché as it sounds, a good breakfast is the best way to set yourself up for a good day, and is less likely to leave you feeling depleted and overwhelmed by lunchtime. For some feel good breakfast ideas that will still make you feel like you’re treating yourself, try smoked salmon and cream cheese on toast with some fresh chilli, or yogurt topped with honey and frozen berries.
3. Let people help
Next time someone offers to help with the washing up, say yes. It’s important to remember that being a good host doesn’t mean putting yourself under strain, and that other people are likely grateful to be given the chance to pay you back for all you’ve done. Plus, often having someone to talk to while you cook or clean up can turn into a much needed catch up, or an opportunity for bonding. So, turn up the Christmas music and turn the boring parts of Christmas into a game for the whole family.
4. Get outside
For a lot of people a Christmas walk is part of tradition, but if this isn’t the case in your house perhaps try and incorporate it into the day. Fresh air and exercise are both free and a proven highly effective stress reliever, so can really help if you’re feeling flushed or overwhelmed. Christmas day is the perfect excuse to get out and moving, just chuck on a scarf and a coat and get walking – whether it’s around the block or further. If a walk is already part of your Christmas tradition, try adding an extra kilometre to your normal route, or pick up the pace – you may be surprised what a difference it can make to your mood and energy levels.
5. Focus on what really matters
Rather than getting bogged down with the little things this year, remind yourself to focus on what truly matters. Whether it’s the warmth of your home, the sparkle of the decorations, the frost on the ground or simply the faces of loved ones sharing food and drinks around you. When you are beginning to feel the strain, or can feel yourself becoming stressed, remind yourself to breathe, take a break, and appreciate all the people around you. Remember, it’s okay to feel stressed or anxious sometimes, even at Christmas, but it’s important not to keep things bottled up. Your loved ones aren’t just there for the festivities, they’re there for you. Talk to someone, and have a wonderful Christmas.
www.dr-julian.com

Source: Dr julian

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Mental Health within the Farming Community: Ending the Stigma

Mental Health within the Farming Community: Ending the Stigma

According to South Somerset Mind, mental health issues affect 1 in 3 farmers – meaning that, within this cohort, rates of depression, anxiety and substance abuse are higher than in the general population. However, despite this, there still remains a huge stigma amongst these kinds of communities, meaning that many individuals feel they cannot open up about their struggles.
Poorer pay for those within the farming industry, combined with the effects of disappointing crop yields and pressure to supply cheaply to large industries can make this once prosperous livelihood extremely stressful. Lower incomes, long hours and rising costs are just some of the things which likely contribute to the increasing number of farmers being diagnosed with mental health issues on a daily basis. But, with all these things to contend with, how can these individuals possibly make time to seek advice and improve their mental health?
Despite rising numbers of diagnoses, these kinds of issues within the farming population are not new, and have been something which have affected individuals for a number of generations. Often, the isolating nature of this kind of work can mean that individuals do not feel as comfortable as they should talking to those close to them about mental health concerns, especially in the case of older generations.
However, with each new day we see small steps towards a more accepting and understanding view of mental health within this community. The rising numbers of diagnoses we are witnessing, although at first may seem strikingly negative, highlights how individuals within these communities are becoming more and more comfortable about coming forward and expressing concerns regarding their mental health. This is a huge step for farming communities and something that we should all be proud of, as this new found acceptance of mental health issues is bringing individuals closer to seeking the help they need, and getting back to feeling themselves. In previous generations, although diagnoses for mental health complaints may have been lower within this community, it is likely that many were suffering in silence – something which we hope no one should have to do in the future.
Possible treatments for mental health issues have also greatly improved in recent years. While there were times when any complaint would be responded to by prescribing anti-depressant or other drugs, there is now a lean more towards talking therapies, which can help individuals to learn how to deal with mental health issues independently. Therapies such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) work on the basis that they equip individuals with the tools they need to manage their own mental health – such that these individuals can remain the strong, independent people that they are.
For individuals in occupations such as farming, which involve long and often anti-social hours, new technology now means that seeking mental health advice doesn’t need to interfere with everyday life. Dr Julian provides just one example of technology advancing towards better mental health for farmers. The Dr Julian app allows individuals to book therapy sessions through their phone or smart device, and receive top-rated treatments and advice from the comfort of their own homes, even outside of usual office hours. Through smart video technology, farmers and others who work long or difficult hours can receive mental health advice via video call, with results proven to be just as good as seeing a therapist in person. This service is ideal for those within the farming community, as it fits with busy work schedules, whilst remaining just as private and confidential as more traditional methods.
With new technology advances and reduced stigma surrounding mental health, the future for individuals within the farming community is looking bright. Seeking mental health advice is
something which no one should ever be ashamed to do, and thanks to individuals within this community, suffering in silence is becoming a thing of the past. If you or someone you know is struggling, speak up, and together we can beat depression, anxiety and stress within this community. Talk to someone. Talk to us. End the mental health stigma in the farming community for good.

Source: Dr julian

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